Color Correction

rerene22

New member
I need some tips for color correcting my videos. I recently shot my project and it looks like some scene from a soap operas. Is there a way to make videos movie-like?
 
B

BenB

Guest
Fist, shoot your video like film: lighting, framing, blocking, etc. Use a 35mm lens adapter such as a Letus to give you the film DOF. And never shoot 24p, it does absolutely nothing to add to the film look. It's only useful if you're printing to 24p film in the end.

Once in post, you'll need a good color grading application like Apple's Color. There's a book you'll want to read called "Apple Pro Training Series: Encyclopedia of Color Correction" by Alexis Van Hurkman. It's generic, so it'll apply to any software you use. But it is pretty much the digital video bible for color grading and correction. I strongly recommend getting a copy. You'll be able to get as close to a film look as possible in post with it.
 
B

BenB

Guest
There is a NEW book out now in the Apple Pro Training Series, which covers color grading/correcting in both FCP and in Color. It's called "Color Correction In Final Cut Studio" and again, is in the "Apple Pro Training Series" collection. We teach it as a two day class, so it's not too overwhelming. Very awesome book, comes with DVD full of tutorial material. Takes you step by step through the professional coloring process. I HIGHLY recommend it.

Good color work (and sound) can make or break a film.
 

Tim Kolb

New member
I need some tips for color correcting my videos. I recently shot my project and it looks like some scene from a soap operas. Is there a way to make videos movie-like?
Hmmm...I might disagree on the 24 frames per second contributing to a film aesthetic...in my opinion it does.

It is likely that you've lit the scene like video if I follow your description. Video shooters key from the front...cinematographers/DPs key from the side or back. 3 point lighting, as taught in many media programs in colleges, works for a local newscast but it makes everything else look extremely contrived.

In color correction, your best hope is, if you've not blown the highlights, to bring the contrast and luma (using the 'levels' effect on most NLE systems would be the easiest way) down. If the highlights are really bright and hot, you might have very few options.

You could always give Red Giant Magic Bullet a try and see what you think of the results...
 

alexcraig

New member
As far as the video you already filmed, there are some things you could do to make it better. It all depends on what software you use. if you are using final cut pro, I like to use something in the video filters called "Image mask" it makes it look a lot like film. You can also up the contrast and make it more green or blue, depending on what feel you want to give it. Filming it at 24p would also help give it more of a film look as well. The lighting also has a lot to do with it also. Basically, just keep working hard at it and you will become a pro in no time
 

grinner

New member
I use Genarts Sapphire's film effect on almost every project, even if just for color correction. I love it. It turn otherwise flat video into quite appealing footage.
 
B

BenB

Guest
Video at 24p looks like video at 24p, plain and simple, not like film. I and many others who've been at this for years agree. Larry Jordan, Bruce Nazarian, Philip Hodges and the like have all written and spoken on this extensively.

24p video has jittery motion that film does not have. Most folks shooting 24p video don't even know that when shooting fast motion on film, it is timed, there's a chart for timing motion across a frame of film many videographers don't know exists. So no, 24p video, although has it's own jittery motion look, it's not the look of film, period.

First, shoot like film, set DOF like film, light like film, in post, color like film, simple as that. And learn proper color grading, and practice it. You'll get way better results than relying on some plug in preset.

Today's film does not look like film did 15 years ago, or 20 years ago, or 30 years ago. The film look "changes" over time, as the technology develops. So, what era of film look are you trying to achieve? What most of the successful, professional young filmmakers I train and work with are doing, is coming up with their own original looks based on the attributes and limitations of the video format itself.
 
Last edited:
Top