Studios Verses Little Guys- Big Screen, computer, Ipod

Kim Welch

Senior Member
Staff member
There has been some heated discussion about the studios coming on the internet scene and pushing out all the little guys. I disagree. I think the little guy will always find a way to out maneuver the bigger corporate teams. And, I think the little guys need to improve at any rate. So, a little stiff competition online is good. It will bring up the value and viewer numbers.

Another thing that I think is that there needs to be a new strategy in the art of making movies that takes into consideration the size of the screen and environment viewer will see the end product on. When you see a movie in the theater on a big screen in a very dark place it is a much different experience and has a much different feeling overall than when you see a movie on a computer screen in a lighted place or on a small screen in a lighted place. Dark scenes are not going to have the same effect on a little screen in a well lit place. So, sitting around the campfire and darker shooting might be best aimed at theatrical releases or living room DVD players.

Brighter active day light types of shooting will work for the computer screens better then darker scenes in my opinion. Additionally, you might want to have your actors and action more animated and reach the farthest corner of each frame with more close ups and extreme close ups for the computer monitors and small screens. You might try something with exaggerated movements and action for I-pod viewing just to see what it feels like. Kind of an "I Love Lucy" approach might be good for modern sit coms to be viewed on the small screens and on I-pods. I don't know. It would be great if I had time to experiment.

Trying to get more sponsors for the site. I have been talking to everyone. Anyone know any big guys at Kodak? I get stonewalled every time I talk to them. I think around the 30th time I got the feeling they don’t like me to much.
 

Bob Kessler

New member
The approach to sound is very different as well. People who watch on their computers at the office, or on their laptop on the train, in a Starbucks or in the park will not hear the subtleties of a deep and detailed sound design. When you mix them loud enough to hear in a noisy environment they take on a different "meaning", so using different sounds may be appropriate, and compressing the mix more than is usual for a theatre or DVD requires a new approach to sound design and mixing.
 

Kim Welch

Senior Member
Staff member
Just had to say something

Just had to say something

it was off the top of my head but i had to say something. there are many others who are super smart that probably have some ideas. I just think there is a better way to use the internet and i pod entertainment factor than what we are currently are doing. maybe i-pods would have more sound variables in the story telling. i guess it is a style thing too.
 
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FilmmakerKurtBaringer

Guest
I think that the biggest challenge is to try to create content that takes advantage of the media that it's being played on. You know, make the iPod or the Computer part of the experience... somehow make it part of the story to truly engage the viewer.

It's like when people who were shooting DV realized that DV was special and had it's own look and stopped trying to emulate film and started to take advantage of DV's look. What was funny was when traditional film started to borrow the look those DV undergrounders created. Think "The Office" or the new "Battlestar Galactica" outer space flight scenes.
 
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filmsforever

Guest
Eye Strain

Eye Strain

I am wondering about the strain on the eyes when you are watching something so small or something that is so close to your face. not just the health matter but the comfort. It can not be comfortable to hold and ipod in your hand through a whole movie. no way.
 
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FilmmakerKurtBaringer

Guest
Going back to my last post on this subject... Eye strain shouldn't be an issue if you produce for the total experience.

You have to be multi-dimensional in your approach for new media. For example- I wouldn't do a two hour feature murder thriller for iPod release, but I would do a series of 3 minute vignettes that tell the same story- I'd incorporate a blog- a website- I'd invite viewer input. The idea is to build the experience... I'd make it a who done it where people could speculate what's going to happen next online. Heck- I'd go so far as to incorporate texting and special mobile phone extras. Make content availabe for desktops- ring tones- whatever...

My point is that it's not a theatre- it's not film- be creative now because we have the opportunity to shape this new media. We're still ground floor, let's not waste the opportunity.
 
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filmsforever

Guest
Just holding the thing is what i am talking about.

Just holding the thing is what i am talking about.

I get tired of holding the popcorn. I dont' want to hold the screen for a full legth feature or even for a short if i really think about it. How do you see that working when i don't want to hold the darn thing in my hand?
 

kennycouch

New member
I really wouldn't be too worried about the studios taking over. I think this is all going to be the same as the music industry. It is now easy for normal joes to make movies, really easy! Pick up a camera and get to work.
 
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