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eduardosantos

Guest
i just want to say thanks, because your blogs on myspace helped me out with what i wanted from sound, and youre right...it shouldnt be about the price...i just spent about 500 dollars i now have what i need for good sound. i bought an azden shotgun mic, i found a great boompole for a cheap price, and i bought a wind jammer. oh yeah and also a closed back headphone. thanks for your tips they sure helped me out...now i cant wait to start shooting my horror movie.
 

Bob Kessler

New member
You are more than welcome.

As an audio post engineer/sound designer I HATE working with sub-par production sound, so it's one of my missions to encourage solid production sound.

"Sound is half of the experience." - Steven Spielberg

When you've got that big budget keep me in mind for the audio post...
 

Harburt

New member
While this note is a bit old now, I just wanted to agree, and also share my thanks

I've been into sound for years but only been doing location sound for about half a year - some of your points for set work are invaluable and its exactly the small things you wouldn't think to notice - I love the idea of always having cough drops etc.. for people with colds. Its that sort of minor detail that makes a good soundy into a great soundy who people always wanna work with.

Just wanted to note as well that I've been doing the post audio for several of the films for which I also did the location recording and I gotta say I know exactly what you mean about having to clean up or re-record. Its an absolute pain in the arse when half or more of the recorded sound is basically useless. I'm quite dissappointed in myself listening back to bits of it. But live and learn, so I'lll know to be far more careful next time.

Cheers Bob
 

Bob Kessler

New member
You're welcome!

I'm working on a short right now that has absolutely stellar production sound. It gives me the opportunity to be subtle, using Foley and sound effects to much greater advantage. It also gives me the opportunity to really work the dialog, replacing phrases and individual words from the unused takes. It's just incredible how much fun, and, perversely, how difficult it can be.
 

Lazlo

New member
My sound designer is angry at me at the moment because my location sound was kind of bad... What's to be done when it rains/snows/hails/sleets at different points during a shoot...
 

Bob Kessler

New member
That's when you need huge amounts of "room tone" to help the audio post process. Lavs are usually the best solution to falling precipitation, although they still pick it up the perspective is better. I guess that they didn't include them in your budget?
 

Lazlo

New member
I actually had access to a wide range of audio equipment, but tried to go the "easy" way or whatever since speed was essential. In retrospect it was an exceptionally bad choice. I was so embarassed when I met with my sound designer the other day, that I resolve to never have bad sound again at all costs. Lots of dubbing. But some of the audio is just "toast". Some of it is great, but it only makes the bad sound even more distracting/noticeable.
 

cybersarge

New member
Am considering starting up a project myself, and wondering if I hire someone to do sound independently, or contract a company to do it. Any advice?
 

Bob Kessler

New member
Sarge -

It's all going to depend upon your budget.

A solid production sound mixer can be hired for $125 to $175 per day plus the cost of renting the production sound equipment.

You can also hire a team (mixer, boom-op and wrangler) with gear, usually starting at about $500 per day.
 
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