What weather should I film my movie in?

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Bababooey

Guest
I'm near the start of shooting my Indie film. I'm curious for your opinions and suggestions. It's a film that has a lot of outdoor scenes. Should I begin filming in November, or just wait untill February-March, when the weather's a little nicer? My main concern is will it be too cold for the cast and crew to shoot in the winter.
 
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Bababooey

Guest
Okay, I've had this question up for almost two months and haven't gotten a single response. Can someone help me?
 

tinx

New member
It really depends on the story of your film...
If it has a bunch of outdoor scenes you really need to decide what time of the year it is, unless you live in an area where you don't have trees... or people.

And professionals shoot in freezing temperatures all the time-- don't let that stop you from shooting in the winter.
 

alexcraig

New member
It all depends on where you live, but I would advise you to film when it's warmer. I live in Michigan and I just got done on a film set as a grip. It was about 35 degrees outside and I had to black out windows outside. By the end of the day I was feeling sick. Although, the winder sky looks really cool especially with overcast. Overcast is good for lighting also. Basically, there are pros and cons with each season. If you are filming in the winter, just make sure your crew is dressed appropriately.
 
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Bababooey

Guest
Thanks so much for those responses guys!

Alexcraig, you said you were "blacking out windows". What exactly is that?
 

alexcraig

New member
Blacking out windows is where you put a black sheet over the window to block out all the sunlight so that it looks like night time inside. We were filming inside a warehouse in the daytime, so I had to get HUGE black tarps and put them over all the windows.
 
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Bababooey

Guest
Blacking out windows is where you put a black sheet over the window to block out all the sunlight so that it looks like night time inside. We were filming inside a warehouse in the daytime, so I had to get HUGE black tarps and put them over all the windows.
Get the heck out. It may be simple to you, but I've never heard of that before. That's brilliant. Thanks!
 

temerson

New member
We had this problem on a feature film that I was AD'ing at the time. It was a student production and by the time pre-production was over (principles from each department had started early, around the middle of August), it was already mid-September. We knew there were going to be a lot of exterior scenes, but there were also going to be more than a few interiors.

What we finally decided to do, since we weren't shooting in order and the weather around us would create horribly different visuals (it was supposed to be set in the summer, so we had to avoid leaves turning and falling as best we could, but we had to avoid snow altogether), was to shoot all of the exteriors first, and in about two weeks. Then, we could shoot the interiors at our leisure on weekends.

The only real problem with this is anytime there is a large window during daylight that might give your season away. Also, we shot over a two-and-a-half month period, so we always had to be on our actors about not getting their hair cut, not losing or gaining too much weight, and trying not to change their tans and facial hair. But, we decided, it's a lot easier to control actors than it is to try and control the weather.

And we always had cover sets, so that if it was raining or the weather was against us, we would be able to shoot an interior scene and try and pick up the exterior at the end of all the exteriors, instead of waiting for the spring. This resulted in a couple of continuity issues, but nothing that was insurpassable.
 
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